Fans translate Mohawk language sequences from Assassin's Creed

Fans translate mohawk language sequences from assassin's creed

(embed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ccrr115My70 (/ embed)

As with previous games in the series, Assassin's Creed Valhalla contains some detailed and faithful historical elements that can be baffled by fans. An example of this in Valhalla is when you discover the area of ​​Vinland, populated by Mohawk people who talk to their character in an untranslated dialogue. Now, the Assassin’s Creed Access the Animus fan group has translated all this Mohawk dialogue with the little help of the Kanien & # 39; kehá: ka Onkwawén: na Raotitióhkwa Language and Cultural Center in Montreal. Eurogamer).

The Vinland part of the game features a more relaxed atmosphere than the rest of Valhalla, as you stroll through the camp and listen to snippets of incidental conversations. The main element translated here is a bonfire story, a myth from the creation of Mohawk, which has previously been told from the perspective of the Oneida tribe in Assassin’s Creed Rogue (the video analyzes the differences between the two tales).

(embed) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytCakhOlcZg (/ embed)

Much of the dialogue makes contextual sense: it’s no surprise to find out that the Mohawk woman you can fish with says something along the lines of “she’d like to fish with me”. Perhaps more surprising is that, once you’ve done some fishing, you tell (in this case) Eivor that “you’re not in good shape, white woman, but you’re fishing well”. Talk about rubbing salt in my wounds – d'oh!

This is Valhalla's second major project from Access the Animus, after previously translating the game's Isu language (with some help from some of the game's creators), a video of which can be seen above.

The Valhalla is absolutely stuffed with Easter eggs and other hidden contents (perhaps too much), and has just received its first major expansion, Wrath of the Druids, in which you devote yourself to the minor task of reuniting ninth-century Ireland. Steven Messner of the PCG described it as "all I loved about Valhalla: the political intrigue, the stunning scenery and the absorbing list of side activities, all present with Irish twists".

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *